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Planning Positive Post-Closure Outcomes for Long-Term Value Creation

This blog is the first in our series on sustainable closure and reclamation

Mine closure planning – a process that begins prior to construction and extends over the mine lifecycle – plays an important role in our ability to create value and improve lives.

We will be sharing updates in the near future about some of the unique closure and reclamation activities at our operations around the world and share more about the teams working toward sustainable post-mining land use.

Proper mine closure significantly minimizes risks to our business and has the potential to provide sustainable community benefits for generations to come. Our business relies as much on effective biodiversity management practices and environmental stewardship as it does on efficient ore processing and production.

As part of our annual business planning process here at Newmont, we evaluate opportunities for concurrent reclamation – the act of rehabilitating land while we are still mining – at all sites where there are areas no longer required for operations. Because the climate, geography and biodiversity can vary drastically from site to site, it is essential that each operation develop and maintain its own Closure and Reclamation Plan (CRP).

Planning the outcome of post-mining land use is a long and complex process. Our stakeholders are invited to participate in the design and implementation planning to ensure that our approach to mine closure anticipates and recognizes social expectations. The environmental, social and economic parameters are bound to change at each operation over the course of a mine’s life span. Hence, ongoing, collaborative stakeholder dialogue and community partnership help equip us to make sound decisions toward sustainable post-closure outcomes.

To learn more about our commitment to provide long-term environmental stability and beneficial post-mining land uses, visit our annual sustainability report, Beyond the Mine, and stay tuned for more in this series.

Comments

  1. It is delightful to see women operating trucks a job that I personally enjoyed in my early days in Mining,

    You should be congratulated for taking care of the environment. I worked in a Gold Mine in Zimbabwe where we reclaimed waste dumps by planting grass over them to take a natural appearance. It was a satisfying experience.

    • Reclamation is indeed an important part of the mining lifecycle. Thanks for sharing your experience with us Kingfrey! Be sure to check out our other site, http://lifecycle.newmont.com/, to learn more about the lifecycle of a mine.

    • Reclamation is indeed an important part of the mining lifecycle. Thanks for sharing your experience with us Kingrey! Be sure to check out our other site, http://lifecycle.newmont.com/, to learn more about the lifecycle of a mine.

  2. It is refreshing to see women operate trucks a job I enjoyed in my early days in Mining. More women should be encouraged to take on these type of jobs.

    You should be congratulated for taking care of the environment. I worked in a Gold Mine in Zimbabwe where we reclaimed waste dumps by planting grass over them to take a natural appearance. It was a pleasant experience.

    • Thanks for sharing your experience, Kingfrey, and for following our journey to progress sustainable and responsible mining. If you haven’t already, check out http://lifecycle.newmont.com/ for more interesting facts about our operations!

  3. Mine closure and the reclamation process show the maturity of the mining industry. I feel many other businesses would benefit from the true cradle to grave planning that is required for a mine; imagine how much more successful some would be.

    I look forward to hearing more!

    • We couldn’t agree more, Ron! If you haven’t already, check out our Lifecycle of a Mine website where we cover mining from exploration to post-closure management. http://lifecycle.newmont.com/

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