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Newmont a Key Partner in the Black Cockatoo Ecology Project

An ambitious project to protect the endangered black cockatoo population of Western Australia reached an important milestone last month when a flock of the birds, fitted with ultra-lightweight tracking technology, took to the skies over Perth.

The Black Cockatoo Ecology Project was identified by Newmont’s Boddington Gold Mine in Australia as especially worthy of support some years back – since that time, environmental teams from the mine have been working with researchers and academics at Perth’s Murdoch University as well as fellow funders, the Department of Parks and Wildlife, the Perth Zoo and the Kaarakin Black Cockatoo Conservation Centre, to support the ground breaking study.

Dutch-developed state-of-the-art technology will allow for intensive tracking and data capture and enable Murdoch University researchers to monitor the species – and the related forest red-tailed black cockatoo – over a five-year period.

It also allows our Boddington mine to continuously improve on the mitigation and rehabilitation methodologies that best support this species.

The cockatoos used in the study are all wild and once-injured birds that have been restored to good health and rehabilitated by staff at the Perth Zoo and the Kaarakin Black Cockatoo Conservation Centre.

Before returning to their natural environment, four of the birds were fitted with uniquely numbered and coloured leg bands, satellite transmitters and solar-powered GPS trackers – a suite of technologies never before used to track parrots.

These tracking devices will feed valuable data back to the researchers multiple times a day so that they can accurately monitor the birds’ every move. By knowing exactly where they are at any given time, researchers can identify the habitat that the birds frequent and the foods that they eat, as well as any obstacles that might threaten their survival.

Associate Professor Kris Warren of Murdoch University’s School of Veterinary and Life Sciences said that the birds will join wild flocks and as these are followed, the researchers will gain a better understanding of the ecology of the species. “This tracking data will make an invaluable and unique contribution to the decision making about the conservation management efforts to save Western Australia’s threatened black cockatoos.”

As part of our commitment to responsible environmental stewardship, Newmont is proud to be a key partner in this world-first conservation initiative. Minimizing and mitigating our impact on water, land, air quality, climate and biodiversity is a core part of our business. Among our other milestone efforts are the Sagebrush Ecosystem Conservation Program in Nevada and a reforestation project in partnership with the Ghana Forest Commission at our Akyem mine.

To learn more about our ongoing commitment to environmental stewardship, visit http://www.beyondthemine.com.

Comments

  1. I am a Romanian geologist and economist who much appreciate this kind of programs.It’s an important action to save word dangered species!I need a similar help to save my geology profession!
    I am addressing to Newmont shareholders to help me find job in mining industry as geologist,field assistant or entr level accountant.

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